“MOVE YOU FEET AND DO SOME GOOD!”

Some of David's recent missions include Burma with the Karen Army, Thailand, Nicaragua with the RAMA Indians, Costa Rica, Japan Tsunami Recovery Operations, and Alabama Tornado Relief Operations. In 2010 David was selected as the chief of security for the Utah Hospital Task Force for post Earthquake Haiti. His duties included protection of the Task Force Commander, a former advisor to President Reagan, as well as ensuring the protection of 120 doctors, nurses and translators. This event was the largest natural disaster in modern recorded history.

JAPAN TSUNAMI RECOVERY MISSION

David went to Japan after the earthquake and tsunami to help the people of Japan. He packed his gear, steadied his feet and bought a plane ticket and simply went to Tokyo in an attempt to help. The 747 wide body flight to Tokyo was virtually empty and there was lots of time to think and rest before the mission would become a gritty reality.

BURMA MISSION KAREN ARMY

David was invited to go on this austere mission because of a previous mission to Costa Rica and Nicaragua by former Special Forces soldiers. This trip was into Myanmar (Burma) to present the fourth phase of a field medial program created by a former Green Beret who is also a Physicians Assistant (PA). The program would be delivered at great risk to the Karen tribe medics who run field clinics and provide combat medicine deep inside of the jungle.

HAITI EARTHQUAKE RELIEF MISSION

Perhaps the most stunning part of this story is the personal effect it had upon David, and the doctors, nurses and translators that went into that country to provide medical relief, protection, rescue operations. David also went on a mission to recover a kidnapped three year old American boy who was abducted from church.

ALABAMA TORNADO RESCUE MISSION

In March of 2012, a deadly tornado outbreak occurred over a large section of the Southern United States into the Ohio Valley region. David went with a couple of his buddies to help outside of the Tuscaloosa and Birmingham Alabama areas. The tornado cut a 3 mile wide swath for 90 miles and wiped away several small towns.

We use cookies to improve your experience and to help us understand how you use our site. Please refer to our cookie notice and privacy statement for more information regarding cookies and other third-party tracking that may be enabled.

Created with
Mailchimp Freddie Badge

© 2022 David Burnell